To The Americans

Do not go gentle into that good night,
Old age should burn and rave at close of day;
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Though wise men at their end know dark is right,
Because their words had forked no lightning they
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Good men, the last wave by, crying how bright
Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight,
And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way,
Do not go gentle into that good night.

Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight
Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay,
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

And you, my father, there on the sad height,
Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray.
Do not go gentle into that good night.
Rage, rage against the dying of the light.

-Dylan Thomas

To Donald Trump, America’s Greatest Serial Killer

Hit the Road Jack


Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back
No more, no more, no more, no more
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back no more
What’d you say?
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back
No more, no more, no more, no more
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back no more


Old woman old woman, oh you treat me so mean
You’re the meanest old woman that I’ve ever seen
I guess if you say so
I’ll have to pack my things and go (that’s right)


Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back
No more, no more, no more, no more
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back no more
What’d you say?
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back
No more, no more, no more, no more
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back no more

Now baby, listen baby, don’t you treat me this way
Cause I’ll be back on my feet some day
Don’t care if you do, cause it’s understood
You ain’t got no money, you just a no good
Well I guess if you say so
I’ll have to pack my things and go (that’s right)


Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back
No more, no more, no more, no more
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back no more
What’d you say?
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back
No more, no more, no more, no more
Hit the road Jack, and don’cha come back no more


Well, (don’cha come back no more)
Uh, what’d you say? (don’cha come back no more)
I didn’t understand you (don’cha come back no more)
You can’t mean that (don’cha come back no more)
Oh, now baby please (don’cha come back no more)
What you’re trying to do to me (don’cha come back no more)

-Ray Charles, Hit The Road Jack

To The Americans

I’m sorry, but I don’t want to be an emperor. That’s not my business. I don’t want to rule or conquer anyone. I should like to help everyone – if possible – Jew, Gentile – black man – white. We all want to help one another. Human beings are like that. We want to live by each other’s happiness – not by each other’s misery. We don’t want to hate and despise one another. In this world there is room for everyone. And the good earth is rich and can provide for everyone. The way of life can be free and beautiful, but we have lost the way.

Greed has poisoned men’s souls, has barricaded the world with hate, has goose-stepped us into misery and bloodshed. We have developed speed, but we have shut ourselves in. Machinery that gives abundance has left us in want. Our knowledge has made us cynical. Our cleverness, hard and unkind. We think too much and feel too little. More than machinery we need humanity. More than cleverness we need kindness and gentleness. Without these qualities, life will be violent and all will be lost….

The aeroplane and the radio have brought us closer together. The very nature of these inventions cries out for the goodness in men – cries out for universal brotherhood – for the unity of us all. Even now my voice is reaching millions throughout the world – millions of despairing men, women, and little children – victims of a system that makes men torture and imprison innocent people.

To those who can hear me, I say – do not despair. The misery that is now upon us is but the passing of greed – the bitterness of men who fear the way of human progress. The hate of men will pass, and dictators die, and the power they took from the people will return to the people. And so long as men die, liberty will never perish. …..

Soldiers! don’t give yourselves to brutes – men who despise you – enslave you – who regiment your lives – tell you what to do – what to think and what to feel! Who drill you – diet you – treat you like cattle, use you as cannon fodder. Don’t give yourselves to these unnatural men – machine men with machine minds and machine hearts! You are not machines! You are not cattle! You are men! You have the love of humanity in your hearts! You don’t hate! Only the unloved hate – the unloved and the unnatural! Soldiers! Don’t fight for slavery! Fight for liberty!

In the 17th Chapter of St Luke it is written: “the Kingdom of God is within man” – not one man nor a group of men, but in all men! In you! You, the people have the power – the power to create machines. The power to create happiness! You, the people, have the power to make this life free and beautiful, to make this life a wonderful adventure.

Then – in the name of democracy – let us use that power – let us all unite. Let us fight for a new world – a decent world that will give men a chance to work – that will give youth a future and old age a security. By the promise of these things, brutes have risen to power. But they lie! They do not fulfil that promise. They never will!

Dictators free themselves but they enslave the people! Now let us fight to fulfil that promise! Let us fight to free the world – to do away with national barriers – to do away with greed, with hate and intolerance. Let us fight for a world of reason, a world where science and progress will lead to all men’s happiness. Soldiers! in the name of democracy, let us all unite!

-Charlie Chaplin, The Great Dictator

To Donald Trump, An Escaped Hobgoblin From Dungeons & Dragons


You keep saying you got something for me
Something you call love, but confess
You’ve been messing where you shouldn’t have been messing


And now someone else is getting all your best
These boots are made for walking
And that’s just what they’ll do
One of these days these boots
Are gonna walk all over you
Yeah


You keep lying when you ought to be truthing
You keep losing when you ought to not bet
You keep saming when you ought to be changing
Now, what’s right is right, but you ain’t been right yet


These boots are made for walking
And that’s just what they’ll do
One of these days these boots
Are gonna walk all over you


You keep playing where you shouldn’t be playing
And you keep thinking that you’ll never get burnt, hah
Well, I’ve just found me a brand new box of matches, yeah
And what he knows you ain’t had time to learn

These boots are made for walking
And that’s just what they’ll do
One of these days these boots
Are gonna walk all over you


Are you ready, boots?
Start walking

-Nancy Sinatra, These Boots Are Made For Walkin’

To The Americans

https://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/2020/11/03/with-hours-until-polls-close-here-are-data-that-will-shape-night/

And

We, most likely, will not know who won the election tonight. Stay on your toes and don’t let Trump gaslight you!

To Both The Americans And Donald Trump, Racist In Chief

How To Vote In Your State:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/elections/2020/how-to-vote/

www.nytimes.com/interactive/2020/us/politics/how-to-vote.html

https://www.cnn.com/election/2020/voter-guide/

For the love of, well, everything, please vote.

Vote against fascism. Vote against white supremacy. Vote against corruption, nepotism and self-dealing.

Vote for honour. Vote for love. Vote for truth, justice and, yes, the American way. Vote for competence, experience and decency.

Vote for Joe Biden and Kamala Harris. The rest of the world begs of you.

To The Americans


Johnny’s in America, Lo-Teks at the wheel
No one needs anyone, they don’t even just pretend
Johnny’s in America


I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid of Americans

Johnny’s in America


Johnny wants a plane, Johnny wants to suck on a Coke
Johnny wants a woman, Johnny wants to think of a joke
Johnny’s in America


I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans
Johnny’s in America

Johnny’s in America, Johnny looks up at the stars
Johnny combs his hair and Johnny wants pussy and cars
Johnny’s in America
Johnny’s in America


I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans


God is an American
God is an American


I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
Yeah, I’m afraid for Americans
I’m afraid for the world
I’m afraid I can’t help it
I’m afraid I can’t
I’m afraid for Americans

God is an American
God is an American
God is an American
God is an American
God is an American

-David Bowie ft. Trent Reznor, I’m Afraid of Americans. With some lyrical alterations by me.

To Donald Trump, Who Is Officially A Worse President Than Both James Buchanan And Herbert Hoover

See you later, Alligator

Well, I saw my baby walkin’
With another man today
Well, I saw my baby walkin’
With another man today
When I asked her what’s the matter
This is what I heard her say

See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
Can’t you see you’re in my way now
Don’t you know you cramp my style

When I though of what she told me
Nearly made me lose my head
When I though of what she told me
Nearly made me lose my head
But the next time that I saw her
Reminded her of what she said

See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
Can’t you see you’re in my way now
Don’t you know you cramp my style
She said I’m sorry pretty daddy
You know my love is just for you
She said I’m sorry pretty daddy
You know my love is just for you
Won’t you say that you’ll forgive me
And say your love for me is true

I said wait a minute ‘gator
I know you mean it just for play
I said wait a minute ‘gator
I know you mean it just for play
Don’t you know you really hurt me
And this is what I have to say

See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
Can’t you see you’re in my way now
Don’t you know you cramp my style

See you later, Alligator
After ‘while crocodile
See you later, Alligator
So long
That’s all
Goodbye

-Bill Haley & His Comets, See You Later Alligator

To The Americans

Governor Stevenson, Senator Johnson, Mr. Butler, Senator Symington, Senator Humphrey, Speaker Rayburn, Fellow Democrats, I want to express my thanks to Governor Stevenson for his generous and heart-warming introduction. 

It was my great honor to place his name in nomination at the 1956 Democratic Convention, and I am delighted to have his support and his counsel and his advice in the coming months ahead. 

With a deep sense of duty and high resolve, I accept your nomination. 

I accept it with a full and grateful heart–without reservation– and with only one obligation–the obligation to devote every effort of body, mind and spirit to lead our Party back to victory and our Nation back to greatness. 

I am grateful, too, that you have provided me with such an eloquent statement of our Party’s platform. Pledges which are made so eloquently are made to be kept. “The Rights of Man”–the civil and economic rights essential to the human dignity of all men–are indeed our goal and our first principles. This is a Platform on which I can run with enthusiasm and conviction. 

And I am grateful, finally, that I can rely in the coming months on so many others–on a distinguished running-mate who brings unity to our ticket and strength to our Platform, Lyndon Johnson–on one of the most articulate statesmen of our time, Adlai Stevenson–on a great spokesman for our needs as a Nation and a people, Stuart Symington–and on that fighting campaigner whose support I welcome, President Harry S. Truman– on my traveling companion in Wisconsin and West Virginia, Senator Hubert Humphrey. On Paul Butler, our devoted and courageous Chairman. 

I feel a lot safer now that they are on my side again. And I am proud of the contrast with our Republican competitors. For their ranks are apparently so thin that not one challenger has come forth with both the competence and the courage to make theirs an open convention. 

I am fully aware of the fact that the Democratic Party, by nominating someone of my faith, has taken on what many regard as a new and hazardous risk–new, at least since 1928. But I look at it this way: the Democratic Party has once again placed its confidence in the American people, and in their ability to render a free, fair judgment. And you have, at the same time, placed your confidence in me, and in my ability to render a free, fair judgment–to uphold the Constitution and my oath of office–and to reject any kind of religious pressure or obligation that might directly or indirectly interfere with my conduct of the Presidency in the national interest. My record of fourteen years supporting public education–supporting complete separation of church and state–and resisting pressure from any source on any issue should be clear by now to everyone. 

I hope that no American, considering the really critical issues facing this country, will waste his franchise by voting either for me or against me solely on account of my religious affiliation. It is not relevant. I want to stress, what some other political or religious leader may have said on this subject. It is not relevant what abuses may have existed in other countries or in other times. It is not relevant what pressures, if any, might conceivably be brought to bear on me. I am telling you now what you are entitled to know: that my decisions on any public policy will be my own–as an American, a Democrat and a free man. 

Under any circumstances, however, the victory we seek in November will not be easy. We all know that in our hearts. We recognize the power of the forces that will be aligned against us. We know they will invoke the name of Abraham Lincoln on behalf of their candidate–despite the fact that the political career of their candidate has often seemed to show charity toward none and malice for all. 

We know that it will not be easy to campaign against a man who has spoken or voted on every known side of every known issue. Mr. Nixon may feel it is his turn now, after the New Deal and the Fair Deal–but before he deals, someone had better cut the cards. 

That “someone” may be the millions of Americans who voted for President Eisenhower but balk at his would be, self-appointed successor. For just as historians tell us that Richard I was not fit to fill the shoes of bold Henry II–and that Richard Cromwell was not fit to wear the mantle of his uncle–they might add in future years that Richard Nixon did not measure to the footsteps of Dwight D. Eisenhower. 

Perhaps he could carry on the party policies–the policies of Nixon, Benson, Dirksen and Goldwater. But this Nation cannot afford such a luxury. Perhaps we could better afford a Coolidge following Harding. And perhaps we could afford a Pierce following Fillmore. But after Buchanan this nation needed a Lincoln–after Taft we needed a Wilson– after Hoover we needed Franklin Roosevelt. . . . And after eight years of drugged and fitful sleep, this nation needs strong, creative Democratic leadership in the White House. 

But we are not merely running against Mr. Nixon. Our task is not merely one of itemizing Republican failures. Nor is that wholly necessary. For the families forced from the farm will know how to vote without our telling them. The unemployed miners and textile workers will know how to vote. The old people without medical care–the families without a decent home–the parents of children without adequate food or schools–they all know that it’s time for a change. 

But I think the American people expect more from us than cries of indignation and attack. The times are too grave, the challenge too urgent, and the stakes too high–to permit the customary passions of political debate. We are not here to curse the darkness, but to light the candle that can guide us through that darkness to a safe and sane future. As Winston Churchill said on taking office some twenty years ago: if we open a quarrel between the present and the past, we shall be in danger of losing the future. 

Today our concern must be with that future. For the world is changing. The old era is ending. The old ways will not do. 

Abroad, the balance of power is shifting. There are new and more terrible weapons–new and uncertain nations–new pressures of population and deprivation. One-third of the world, it has been said, may be free- -but one-third is the victim of cruel repression–and the other one- third is rocked by the pangs of poverty, hunger and envy. More energy is released by the awakening of these new nations than by the fission of the atom itself. 

Meanwhile, Communist influence has penetrated further into Asia, stood astride the Middle East and now festers some ninety miles off the coast of Florida. Friends have slipped into neutrality–and neutrals into hostility. As our keynoter reminded us, the President who began his career by going to Korea ends it by staying away from Japan. 

The world has been close to war before–but now man, who has survived all previous threats to his existence, has taken into his mortal hands the power to exterminate the entire species some seven times over. 

Here at home, the changing face of the future is equally revolutionary. The New Deal and the Fair Deal were bold measures for their generations–but this is a new generation. 

A technological revolution on the farm has led to an output explosion–but we have not yet learned to harness that explosion usefully, while protecting our farmers’ right to full parity income. 

An urban population explosion has overcrowded our schools, cluttered up our suburbs, and increased the squalor of our slums. 

A peaceful revolution for human rights–demanding an end to racial discrimination in all parts of our community life–has strained at the leashes imposed by timid executive leadership. 

A medical revolution has extended the life of our elder citizens without providing the dignity and security those later years deserve. And a revolution of automation finds machines replacing men in the mines and mills of America, without replacing their incomes or their training or their needs to pay the family doctor, grocer and landlord. 

There has also been a change–a slippage–in our intellectual and moral strength. Seven lean years of drought and famine have withered a field of ideas. Blight has descended on our regulatory agencies–and a dry rot, beginning in Washington, is seeping into every corner of America–in the payola mentality, the expense account way of life, the confusion between what is legal and what is right. Too many Americans have lost their way, their will and their sense of historic purpose. 

It is a time, in short, for a new generation of leadership–new men to cope with new problems and new opportunities. 

All over the world, particularly in the newer nations, young men are coming to power–men who are not bound by the traditions of the past–men who are not blinded by the old fears and hates and rivalries– young men who can cast off the old slogans and delusions and suspicions. 

The Republican nominee-to-be, of course, is also a young man. But his approach is as old as McKinley. His party is the party of the past. His speeches are generalities from Poor Richard’s Almanac. Their platform, made up of left-over Democratic planks, has the courage of our old convictions. Their pledge is a pledge to the status quo–and today there can be no status quo. 

For I stand tonight facing west on what was once the last frontier. From the lands that stretch three thousand miles behind me, the pioneers of old gave up their safety, their comfort and sometimes their lives to build a new world here in the West. They were not the captives of their own doubts, the prisoners of their own price tags. Their motto was not “every man for himself”–but “all for the common cause.” They were determined to make that new world strong and free, to overcome its hazards and its hardships, to conquer the enemies that threatened from without and within. 

Today some would say that those struggles are all over–that all the horizons have been explored–that all the battles have been won– that there is no longer an American frontier. 

But I trust that no one in this vast assemblage will agree with those sentiments. For the problems are not all solved and the battles are not all won–and we stand today on the edge of a New Frontier–the frontier of the 1960’s–a frontier of unknown opportunities and perils– a frontier of unfulfilled hopes and threats. 

Woodrow Wilson’s New Freedom promised our nation a new political and economic framework. Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal promised security and succor to those in need. But the New Frontier of which I speak is not a set of promises–it is a set of challenges. It sums up not what I intend to offer the American people, but what I intend to ask of them. It appeals to their pride, not to their pocketbook–it holds out the promise of more sacrifice instead of more security. 

But I tell you the New Frontier is here, whether we seek it or not. Beyond that frontier are the uncharted areas of science and space, unsolved problems of peace and war, unconquered pockets of ignorance and prejudice, unanswered questions of poverty and surplus. It would be easier to shrink back from that frontier, to look to the safe mediocrity of the past, to be lulled by good intentions and high rhetoric–and those who prefer that course should not cast their votes for me, regardless of party. 

But I believe the times demand new invention, innovation, imagination, decision. I am asking each of you to be pioneers on that New Frontier. My call is to the young in heart, regardless of age–to all who respond to the Scriptural call: “Be strong and of a good courage; be not afraid, neither be thou dismayed.” 

For courage–not complacency–is our need today–leadership–not salesmanship. And the only valid test of leadership is the ability to lead, and lead vigorously. A tired nation, said David Lloyd George, is a Tory nation–and the United States today cannot afford to be either tired or Tory. 

There may be those who wish to hear more–more promises to this group or that–more harsh rhetoric about the men in the Kremlin–more assurances of a golden future, where taxes are always low and subsidies ever high. But my promises are in the platform you have adopted–our ends will not be won by rhetoric and we can have faith in the future only if we have faith in ourselves. 

For the harsh facts of the matter are that we stand on this frontier at a turning-point in history. We must prove all over again whether this nation–or any nation so conceived–can long endure–whether our society–with its freedom of choice, its breadth of opportunity, its range of alternatives–can compete with the single-minded advance of the Communist system. 

Can a nation organized and governed such as ours endure? That is the real question. Have we the nerve and the will? Can we carry through in an age where we will witness not only new breakthroughs in weapons of destruction–but also a race for mastery of the sky and the rain, the ocean and the tides, the far side of space and the inside of men’s minds? 

Are we up to the task–are we equal to the challenge? Are we willing to match the Russian sacrifice of the present for the future–or must we sacrifice our future in order to enjoy the present? 

That is the question of the New Frontier. That is the choice our nation must make–a choice that lies not merely between two men or two parties, but between the public interest and private comfort–between national greatness and national decline–between the fresh air of progress and the stale, dank atmosphere of “normalcy”–between determined dedication and creeping mediocrity. 

All mankind waits upon our decision. A whole world looks to see what we will do. We cannot fail their trust, we cannot fail to try. 

It has been a long road from that first snowy day in New Hampshire to this crowded convention city. Now begins another long journey, taking me into your cities and homes all over America. Give me your help, your hand, your voice, your vote. Recall with me the words of Isaiah: “They that wait upon the Lord shall renew their strength; they shall mount up with wings as eagles; they shall run and not be weary.” 

As we face the coming challenge, we too, shall wait upon the Lord, and ask that he renew our strength. Then shall we be equal to the test. Then we shall not be weary. And then we shall prevail. 

Thank you. 

-John F. Kennedy, in his acceptance speech for the Democratic nomination for President.

Kennedy failed to live up to the ideals outlined in this speech, and indeed many of them were deeply flawed.

Vote for them anyway. The other option is no longer Richard Nixon, but Benito Mussolini.

To Donald Trump, The Greatest Murderer of Americans In History

Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye


Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye


He’ll never love you the way that I love you
‘Cause if he did, no no, he wouldn’t make you cry


He might be thrillin’ baby, but a-my love (My love, my love)
So dog-gone willin’, so kiss him
(I wanna see you kiss him, wanna see you kiss him)
Go on and kiss him goodbye, now


Na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
(Listen to me now)


He’s never near you to comfort and cheer you
When all those sad tears are fallin’, baby, from your eyes


He might be thrillin’ baby but a-my love (My love, my love)
So dog-gone willin’, so kiss him
(I wanna see you kiss him, I wanna see you kiss him)
Go on and kiss him goodbye

(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
Na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye


(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye
Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na, hey, hey, hey, goodbye


I really love you girl, I really need you now
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
I got to have you each and every day, I need ya
(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
Come on, girl
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
Come on, girl, alright
(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
He really hurt ya, I’m on my knees, yeah
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
I can’t have got him, well alright
(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
Come on, give it to me, na na na na na na na na
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
It’s alright, give it to me one time, hey
(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
Na na na na na na na
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
Hey, hey, hey, girl, alright
(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
Hey, here we go, na na na na na na na na
(Na-na-na-na, na-na-na-na)
Girl, alright
(Hey, hey, hey, goodbye)
I really…

Steam, Na Na Hey Hey Kiss Him Goodbye